1. Big Ben/Elizabeth Tower, London.

    Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

    The Palace of Westminster (AKA The Houses of Parliament) over look a tranquil River Thames. The Houses of Parliament is most famous for the Clock Tower on the Northern flank, known world-wide as Big Ben. Big Ben however, is actually the name of the Bell held within the Clock Tower, whilst the tower itself is known as the Elizabeth Tower, as of September 2012. The Original Palace was destroyed in 1834 by a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt over the course of 30 years, finally being completed in 1870. The Elizabeth Tower was completed 12 years earlier however, in 1858, and remains to this day as the worlds Tallest four-faced chiming clock.

     

  2. St George Wharf, London.

    Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

    St Georges Wharf is a riverside development in the London Borough of Lambeth, located on the southern bank of the River Thames.The 93,000 square metres (1,000,000 sq ft) mixed-use development is located between the Vauxhall Cross road junction and river, and is near Vauxhall station. The River Effra, one of the Thames’ many underground tributaries, empties into the main river close-by. St George Wharf Tower is a residential skyscraper under construction at the development. When built, it will be 181 metres (594 ft) tall with 49 storeys, making it the tallest residential building in the United Kingdom.

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  3. hemelhempstead:

    Box Moor Trust.

    Founded in 1594, The Box Moor Trust manages some 480 acres of agricultural and amenity land for the benefit of the inhabitants of Hemel Hempstead and Bovingdon.  A registered charity, the Trust’s mission is to manage the estate in an environmentally sensitive manner for recreation, biodiversity, the provision of diverse opportunities for lifelong learning and to ensure that the enjoyment of such initiatives is accessible to all.

    As well as being an area of natural beauty, the Trusts lands also includes some Fauna and Flora not local to the area having made ties with the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. These include the Belted Galloway cattle, and the ‘At Risk’ Norfolk Horn breed of sheep, Red Kites, Buzzards and the Wild Juniper shrub.

     

  4. hemelhempstead:

    Apsley Marina

    Built in 2003, the Marina in the Apsley district of Hemel Hempstead is a compact mooring which is part of a smart regeneration project, providing boaters, either with the perfect stopping off place on your journey, or as a more permanent mooring.Due to it’s location on the previously mentioned Grand Union Canal, Apsley was an important Victorian Mill Town.

    Located on the confluence of two rivers (the Gade and the Bulbourne), the area was an obvious location for a Mill. John Dickinson, the inventor of a new method of continuous paper-making, purchased an existing mill in the area in 1809. Due in part to his revolutionary method of manufacturing, the John Dickinson Stationary Company became, and remains to this day, one of the largest station manufactures in the world.

     

  5. Big Ben/Elizabeth Tower, London.

    Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

    The Palace of Westminster (AKA The Houses of Parliament) over look a tranquil River Thames. The Houses of Parliament is most famous for the Clock Tower on the Northern flank, known world-wide as Big Ben. Big Ben however, is actually the name of the Bell held within the Clock Tower, whilst the tower itself is known as the Elizabeth Tower, as of September 2012. The Original Palace was destroyed in 1834 by a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt over the course of 30 years, finally being completed in 1870. The Elizabeth Tower was completed 12 years earlier however, in 1858, and remains to this day as the worlds Tallest four-faced chiming clock.

     

  6. Big Ben/Elizabeth Tower, London.

    Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

    The Palace of Westminster (AKA The Houses of Parliament) over look a tranquil River Thames. The Houses of Parliament is most famous for the Clock Tower on the Northern flank, known world-wide as Big Ben. Big Ben however, is actually the name of the Bell held within the Clock Tower, whilst the tower itself is known as the Elizabeth Tower, as of September 2012. The Original Palace was destroyed in 1834 by a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt over the course of 30 years, finally being completed in 1870. The Elizabeth Tower was completed 12 years earlier however, in 1858, and remains to this day as the worlds Tallest four-faced chiming clock.

     

  7. hemelhempstead:

    Apsley Marina

    Built in 2003, the Marina in the Apsley district of Hemel Hempstead is a compact mooring which is part of a smart regeneration project, providing boaters, either with the perfect stopping off place on your journey, or as a more permanent mooring.Due to it’s location on the previously mentioned Grand Union Canal, Apsley was an important Victorian Mill Town.

    Located on the confluence of two rivers (the Gade and the Bulbourne), the area was an obvious location for a Mill. John Dickinson, the inventor of a new method of continuous paper-making, purchased an existing mill in the area in 1809. Due in part to his revolutionary method of manufacturing, the John Dickinson Stationary Company became, and remains to this day, one of the largest station manufactures in the world.

     

  8. hemelhempstead:

    Box Moor Trust.

    Founded in 1594, The Box Moor Trust manages some 480 acres of agricultural and amenity land for the benefit of the inhabitants of Hemel Hempstead and Bovingdon.  A registered charity, the Trust’s mission is to manage the estate in an environmentally sensitive manner for recreation, biodiversity, the provision of diverse opportunities for lifelong learning and to ensure that the enjoyment of such initiatives is accessible to all.

    As well as being an area of natural beauty, the Trusts lands also includes some Fauna and Flora not local to the area having made ties with the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. These include the Belted Galloway cattle, and the ‘At Risk’ Norfolk Horn breed of sheep, Red Kites, Buzzards and the Wild Juniper shrub.

     

  9. hemelhempstead:

    Grand Union Canal

    The Grand Union Canal is an English Canal system that starts in London and ends in Birmingham, stretching for 137 miles (220 km) with 166 locks.The above shot was taken in Hemel Hempstead, between Boxmoor and Winkwell.  Prior to the invention of the automobile and the steam locomotive, the majority of England’s freight was carried on the canals, often pulled by horse, between London and England’s ‘Second City’, Birmingham.These days however, they are mainly used for Recreation.

     

  10. hemelhempstead:

    Heath Lane Cemetery

    Heath Lane Cemetery is located in the Boxmoor district of Hemel Hempstead and was the first municipal cemetery in the Dacorum area. First opened in 1878 it is a quintessential Victorian funeral, which boasts not one, but two chapels. One chapel was used for the funerals of Church of England followers, whilst the other was used for individuals of other denominations and religions.  The cemetery is also home to a large number of redwood trees, which are some of the largest trees in the Dacorum area.